Vermont / New Hampshire Chapter

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How can I get a chestnut tree?

The TACF National Office, Asheville, NC, provides chestnuts to members only. Bare root ‘pure’ American seedlings are offered through the TACF journal “Chestnut” in early Spring. Potentially blight-resistant hybrid Chinese/American chestnuts are available to Seed Level Members. The blight-resistance of these trees cannot be guaranteed; they are for initial testing and research and are not available to the general public. Blight resistance seems to be directly correlated with the percent of Chinese chestnut in the hybrid genome. Note that these seeds or seedlings are not being sold but are a benefit of membership. By participating as a seed level member, you help TACF continue to do its important work and continually improve material for release.

“Pure” American chestnut seeds (nuts) are available in the Spring to VT/NH Chapter members on a limited basis. These trees are not blight-resistant, but they are fun to grow and will sometimes live many years. This ‘free nut’ offering with video growing instructions is available to VT/NH Chapter members each spring while supplies last. These are wild American chestnut seeds, and as is true with all American chestnuts, are susceptible to blight. An email notice about this offer is sent to members late winter.

Instructions for planting and growing chestnuts can be found on the TACF fact sheets web page.

Do you think you’ve found an American chestnut tree in Vermont or New Hampshire?

Please collect a leaf and twig sample, read these instructions, print a locator form and submit to:

Kendra Collins, TACF New England Regional Science Coordinator
USFS Northern Research Station, 705 Spear Street
South Burlington, VT 05403

Are you interested in hosting a chestnut orchard?

Please read the planting manual for more information about what is involved with growing chestnut trees. This manual was developed for Pennsylvania, but the considerations outlined are applicable to Vermont and New Hampshire as well.

Educational Planting Guidelines

An educational planting is an opportunity for host organizations to partner with TACF. TACF will provide an appropriate number of Possibly Blight Resistant Chestnuts (generally five or six) for the host to plant in highly visible locations. The host agrees to join TACF and install interpretive signs. The benefit to the host is a living educational addition to ongoing programs. This outreach activity is a membership-building and volunteer recruitment strategy for TACF.

Planting Guidelines include:

  1. Site requirements
  2. Planting Instructions
  3. Host Responsibilities
  4. TACF Responsibilities

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Pictured here: An 1891 circular for American chestnuts reveals the value of chestnuts to our community of growers and the agricultural pipeline that fed our families and communities. This circular shows $271,527 in sales from TWO months of harvesting. Today's value would be almost $9 million! The seller of these chestnuts probably paid less than $2/bushel wholesale but market rate was about $10 to $12 per bushel. According to research, the legal weight limit of a bushel of chestnuts was about 50 pounds (in TN) and 57 pounds (in VA). This two months of harvesting amounted to approximately 1.3 million pounds of chestnuts. ... See MoreSee Less

Pictured here: An 1891 circular for American chestnuts reveals the value of chestnuts to our community of growers and the agricultural pipeline that fed our families and communities. This circular shows $271,527 in sales from TWO months of harvesting. Todays value would be almost $9 million! The seller of these chestnuts probably paid less than $2/bushel wholesale but market rate was about $10 to $12 per bushel. According to research, the legal weight limit of a bushel of chestnuts was about 50 pounds (in TN) and 57 pounds (in VA). This two months of harvesting amounted to approximately 1.3 million pounds of chestnuts.

Comment on Facebook

These numbers from 1981 are hard to believe. This was just prior to the introduction of chestnut blight in the USA when there was likely an abundance of trees and nuts. There is no header to indicate buyer / seller/ location. Dated Fall of 1890 is not a good business practice. The perfect print looks like it was done on a modern day grocery bag. Was this created by AI?

Where was the harvest? European or Japanese hybrids?

youtu.be/2VYviSHyB98

Meet Ciera! Our nursery manager at Meadowview Research Farms.

This interview is episode 1 of our new YouTube series "Behind the Bark."

Behind the Bark is a casual interview series by The American Chestnut Foundation to dive deeper into the lives of the wonderful people who are behind the mission of returning the iconic American chestnut to its native range.

The American Chestnut Foundation's Meadowview Research Farms
... See MoreSee Less

Video image

Comment on Facebook

One of the biggest questions we receive is "how do I submit a public comment, what am I supposed to say?" The answer is pretty simple: why does the American chestnut tree matter to you? When submitting a comment, you just need to be unique and authentic. Tell your personal story of why the American chestnut is important to you: maybe your family grew up with chestnut trees and can remember when they filled the forests, or maybe you're passionate about forest health and restoration, or maybe you grow chestnut trees on your land and want more.

The USDA looks for unique and custom comments. You don't have to be a scientist to support the restoration of the American chestnut! You can be anyone, all you need is a few sentences of why you support this effort. Check out these helpful tips and sample comments that we've compiled if you're still unsure of what to say. Be sure to submit your comment by midnight on Thursday, January 26.

Visit acf.org/resources-deregulation-darling58/ to learn more and to submit your comment.
... See MoreSee Less

One of the biggest questions we receive is how do I submit a public comment, what am I supposed to say? The answer is pretty simple: why does the American chestnut tree matter to you? When submitting a comment, you just need to be unique and authentic. Tell your personal story of why the American chestnut is important to you: maybe your family grew up with chestnut trees and can remember when they filled the forests, or maybe youre passionate about forest health and restoration, or maybe you grow chestnut trees on your land and want more. 

The USDA looks for unique and custom comments. You dont have to be a scientist to support the restoration of the American chestnut! You can be anyone, all you need is a few sentences of why you support this effort. Check out these helpful tips and sample comments that weve compiled if youre still unsure of what to say. Be sure to submit your comment by midnight on Thursday, January 26. 

Visit https://acf.org/resources-deregulation-darling58/ to learn more and to submit your comment.Image attachmentImage attachment+3Image attachment
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