Virginia Chapter

Resources and Programs

In this section you will find information about the American chestnut and efforts to restore it to America’s woodlands. Included is information on the science behind the American chestnut breeding program, educational resources and materials, and reference information about chestnuts.

Information for Chestnut Growers

A.T. MEGA-Transect Chestnut Project

TACF Grower’s List – A way to communicate with other American chestnut restoration growers about issues related to growing chestnuts – link to Penn State web site

Planting Time is Coming!  – Guidelines for starting seedlings

TACF Resources – link to TACF resources web page

Hypovirulence Resources – MD Chapter web page

Grafting Resources – MD Chapter web page

Penn State Chestnut Growers Website – Everything a chestnut grower needs to know and much more, including back issues of the TACF Journal and other publications in pdf format.

The American Chestnut video by Thomas Nassif – An 18 minute video that tells the story of the chestnut and TACF, documents controlled pollination and shows the basics of hypovirulence.

Teaching Materials

Lesson Plans and Class Materials

The American Chestnut Tree Story

A short pamphlet designed for 4H middle school students.  It contains information about the American chestnut tree, a children’s story and other information.

Lesson Plans by Shelley Casey – NSF Kenan Fellows Program at NCSU

Students will study how biotechnology is being used to develop a blight resistant tree. They will engage in hands-on activities that have students apply their knowledge of DNA and genetics to simulate the steps needed to find the genes for resistance and insert them into an American Chestnut tree. Lessons are designed to be used for any level of Biology student and do not require high tech equipment.

Issue 11 Compass Magazine

A great resource for classroom use, with good photos and basic information along with an introduction to some advanced scientific work.

From the Woods – Chestnut Brochure

This four-page, full-color publication tells the history of American Chestnut, the blight that wiped it out, and research on blight resistant chestnut trees. It is part of an educational series for youth (2004).

Games for Kids

Fun games kids can play while learning about the American chestnut.  Downloadable pdf files.

Charlie Chestnut Workbook Labels

Doris Goldman Coloring Book

Created by Pennsylvania Chapter volunteer Doris Goldman.

Additional Resources

Resources for Data Collectors

Please download and print the map(s) and corresponding count report form(s):

Virginia and north:

http://sfr.psu.edu/public/chestnut/reports/mega-transect/at-maps

South of Virginia:

Maps & Charts S of VA

Other Forms:

Kit & checklist – 2013

Large Tree Chestnut Report – 2013

Large Tree Table Report – 2013

Count Report Form – 2013 (Use only if large tree report or table are not available)

Chart_Trail_Change

A.T. National Park Research Permit

Blue Ridge Parkway Permit – 2013-2014

Shenandoah National Park Research Permit

Virginia Chapter Menu

National Facebook

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Pictured here: An 1891 circular for American chestnuts reveals the value of chestnuts to our community of growers and the agricultural pipeline that fed our families and communities. This circular shows $271,527 in sales from TWO months of harvesting. Today's value would be almost $9 million! The seller of these chestnuts probably paid less than $2/bushel wholesale but market rate was about $10 to $12 per bushel. According to research, the legal weight limit of a bushel of chestnuts was about 50 pounds (in TN) and 57 pounds (in VA). This two months of harvesting amounted to approximately 1.3 million pounds of chestnuts. ... See MoreSee Less

Pictured here: An 1891 circular for American chestnuts reveals the value of chestnuts to our community of growers and the agricultural pipeline that fed our families and communities. This circular shows $271,527 in sales from TWO months of harvesting. Todays value would be almost $9 million! The seller of these chestnuts probably paid less than $2/bushel wholesale but market rate was about $10 to $12 per bushel. According to research, the legal weight limit of a bushel of chestnuts was about 50 pounds (in TN) and 57 pounds (in VA). This two months of harvesting amounted to approximately 1.3 million pounds of chestnuts.

Comment on Facebook

These numbers from 1981 are hard to believe. This was just prior to the introduction of chestnut blight in the USA when there was likely an abundance of trees and nuts. There is no header to indicate buyer / seller/ location. Dated Fall of 1890 is not a good business practice. The perfect print looks like it was done on a modern day grocery bag. Was this created by AI?

Where was the harvest? European or Japanese hybrids?

youtu.be/2VYviSHyB98

Meet Ciera! Our nursery manager at Meadowview Research Farms.

This interview is episode 1 of our new YouTube series "Behind the Bark."

Behind the Bark is a casual interview series by The American Chestnut Foundation to dive deeper into the lives of the wonderful people who are behind the mission of returning the iconic American chestnut to its native range.

The American Chestnut Foundation's Meadowview Research Farms
... See MoreSee Less

Video image

Comment on Facebook

One of the biggest questions we receive is "how do I submit a public comment, what am I supposed to say?" The answer is pretty simple: why does the American chestnut tree matter to you? When submitting a comment, you just need to be unique and authentic. Tell your personal story of why the American chestnut is important to you: maybe your family grew up with chestnut trees and can remember when they filled the forests, or maybe you're passionate about forest health and restoration, or maybe you grow chestnut trees on your land and want more.

The USDA looks for unique and custom comments. You don't have to be a scientist to support the restoration of the American chestnut! You can be anyone, all you need is a few sentences of why you support this effort. Check out these helpful tips and sample comments that we've compiled if you're still unsure of what to say. Be sure to submit your comment by midnight on Thursday, January 26.

Visit acf.org/resources-deregulation-darling58/ to learn more and to submit your comment.
... See MoreSee Less

One of the biggest questions we receive is how do I submit a public comment, what am I supposed to say? The answer is pretty simple: why does the American chestnut tree matter to you? When submitting a comment, you just need to be unique and authentic. Tell your personal story of why the American chestnut is important to you: maybe your family grew up with chestnut trees and can remember when they filled the forests, or maybe youre passionate about forest health and restoration, or maybe you grow chestnut trees on your land and want more. 

The USDA looks for unique and custom comments. You dont have to be a scientist to support the restoration of the American chestnut! You can be anyone, all you need is a few sentences of why you support this effort. Check out these helpful tips and sample comments that weve compiled if youre still unsure of what to say. Be sure to submit your comment by midnight on Thursday, January 26. 

Visit https://acf.org/resources-deregulation-darling58/ to learn more and to submit your comment.Image attachmentImage attachment+3Image attachment
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