Maine Chapter

Seed Sales

If you want to get some American chestnuts, we can help!

The Maine Chapter of TACF collects seeds from native chestnut trees in Maine every year for:

  • Research purposes
  • Fedco Trees seedling sales
  • Volunteers and new member rewards
  • Fundraising sales to support our work
Plant sooner or later?

The transgenic Darling 58 chestnut holds promise for a blight resistant American chestnut in the future. Until then, any American chestnut available for sale will be susceptible to blight. It might live 10-30 years without disease, long enough to flower and produce nuts. When it flowers D58 transgenic pollen might be available to pollinate your tree. You could produce your own nuts that grow into blight resistant trees!

Chinese chestnuts and hybrids sold commercially might resist blight but won’t necessarily thrive in northern climes.

However, there are good reasons to start planting sooner than later:

  • Your native chestnut trees can provide an ideal nursery shelter for planting blight-resistant chestnuts when they become available.
  • Growing native chestnuts now lets you test the suitability of your site. Soil must be acidic and well drained.
  • You can learn now what is needed to get good growth later.
  • Growing ME native chestnuts helps us preserve local genetic diversity.
  • Happy chestnuts can grow 4 feet in height and 1” diameter per year!
  • In 10 to 20 years, your native chestnuts will be producing nuts, poles, and small saw-logs.
How to get seeds or seedlings

Here are ways to get chestnuts to plant and enjoy:

  • Join the Maine Chapter of TACF and receive a new member reward of 10 seeds.
  • Lend a hand at a volunteer event and receive 10 seeds.
  • TACF members receive an invitation to buy our limited supply of pure American seeds or seedlings if/when available.
  • Viles Arboretum in Augusta and Ellis’ Greenhouse in Hudson ME sell seedlings during the summer months.
  • Buy 2-yr-old Maine chestnut seedlings from Fedco Trees. Fedco buys seeds from the ME Chapter and gives us back $3 per tree.

Maine Chapter Menu

National Facebook

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Pictured here: An 1891 circular for American chestnuts reveals the value of chestnuts to our community of growers and the agricultural pipeline that fed our families and communities. This circular shows $271,527 in sales from TWO months of harvesting. Today's value would be almost $9 million! The seller of these chestnuts probably paid less than $2/bushel wholesale but market rate was about $10 to $12 per bushel. According to research, the legal weight limit of a bushel of chestnuts was about 50 pounds (in TN) and 57 pounds (in VA). This two months of harvesting amounted to approximately 1.3 million pounds of chestnuts. ... See MoreSee Less

Pictured here: An 1891 circular for American chestnuts reveals the value of chestnuts to our community of growers and the agricultural pipeline that fed our families and communities. This circular shows $271,527 in sales from TWO months of harvesting. Todays value would be almost $9 million! The seller of these chestnuts probably paid less than $2/bushel wholesale but market rate was about $10 to $12 per bushel. According to research, the legal weight limit of a bushel of chestnuts was about 50 pounds (in TN) and 57 pounds (in VA). This two months of harvesting amounted to approximately 1.3 million pounds of chestnuts.

Comment on Facebook

These numbers from 1981 are hard to believe. This was just prior to the introduction of chestnut blight in the USA when there was likely an abundance of trees and nuts. There is no header to indicate buyer / seller/ location. Dated Fall of 1890 is not a good business practice. The perfect print looks like it was done on a modern day grocery bag. Was this created by AI?

Where was the harvest? European or Japanese hybrids?

youtu.be/2VYviSHyB98

Meet Ciera! Our nursery manager at Meadowview Research Farms.

This interview is episode 1 of our new YouTube series "Behind the Bark."

Behind the Bark is a casual interview series by The American Chestnut Foundation to dive deeper into the lives of the wonderful people who are behind the mission of returning the iconic American chestnut to its native range.

The American Chestnut Foundation's Meadowview Research Farms
... See MoreSee Less

Video image

Comment on Facebook

One of the biggest questions we receive is "how do I submit a public comment, what am I supposed to say?" The answer is pretty simple: why does the American chestnut tree matter to you? When submitting a comment, you just need to be unique and authentic. Tell your personal story of why the American chestnut is important to you: maybe your family grew up with chestnut trees and can remember when they filled the forests, or maybe you're passionate about forest health and restoration, or maybe you grow chestnut trees on your land and want more.

The USDA looks for unique and custom comments. You don't have to be a scientist to support the restoration of the American chestnut! You can be anyone, all you need is a few sentences of why you support this effort. Check out these helpful tips and sample comments that we've compiled if you're still unsure of what to say. Be sure to submit your comment by midnight on Thursday, January 26.

Visit acf.org/resources-deregulation-darling58/ to learn more and to submit your comment.
... See MoreSee Less

One of the biggest questions we receive is how do I submit a public comment, what am I supposed to say? The answer is pretty simple: why does the American chestnut tree matter to you? When submitting a comment, you just need to be unique and authentic. Tell your personal story of why the American chestnut is important to you: maybe your family grew up with chestnut trees and can remember when they filled the forests, or maybe youre passionate about forest health and restoration, or maybe you grow chestnut trees on your land and want more. 

The USDA looks for unique and custom comments. You dont have to be a scientist to support the restoration of the American chestnut! You can be anyone, all you need is a few sentences of why you support this effort. Check out these helpful tips and sample comments that weve compiled if youre still unsure of what to say. Be sure to submit your comment by midnight on Thursday, January 26. 

Visit https://acf.org/resources-deregulation-darling58/ to learn more and to submit your comment.Image attachmentImage attachment+3Image attachment
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