Connecticut news

CHESTNUT HARVEST SCHEDULE

CHESTNUT HARVESTING
September 16th through September 23

Due to time constraints on my schedule this year, my time this harvest season will be limited.  If anyone would like to help harvest burs during the last two weeks of September, please let us know.  We will be focusing on wild trees where we will need more representation in our GCOs, but we could also use nuts to give to TACF for fund raising or research projects from the other known nut producing trees.  Tree locations include Suffield, Thompson, Bristol, and Mystic in addition to the locations listed below.  If anyone else would like to help, please let us know by replying to this email along with times of availability or contact me directly at jswattchestnut@gmail.com.

Saturday, September 17th, 9:00 AM  Wyantenock SF in Warren. Meet at the parking area on Rt 341 (across from 182 Woodville Rd.).

12:00 AM. Nassahegan SF in Burlington.  Meet at the end of Miller Rd. Burlington.  This area is difficult to walk across the harvest slash, but help is needed to carry ladders to the trees.

3:00 PM  Birge Pond, Bristol.  Meet in the parking area at Birge Pond on Ambler Rd.

Sunday, September 18th, 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM- Old Lyme Library and Nehantic State Forest Goodwin Trail in East Lyme. Meet at 2 Library Lane, Old Lyme at 9:00 AM and after quickly collecting the burs that we had manually pollinated this past summer, we will travel to the Parking area at the end of Holmes Rd in East Lyme.  We will hike about 2-3 miles on a loop to collect burs from several nut-producing trees along the way.  The forest road is generally easy to travel, but one steep foot path and off trail hiking will be encountered.

Monday, Spetember 19th, 10:00 AM Lambtown Rd, Mystic – We will be investigating a report of flowering chestnut trees in the area of the powerline cut and harvest any burs we can find on the trees there.

Tuesday, September 20th,  7:45 AM, McLean Game Refuge, Granby – Meet at the parking area on Rt. 202 .  Harvest being done by Eversource.  Possibly going to Cider Mill Rd after to harvest with Eversource there as well.

Thursday, September 22nd, 10:30 AM Renbrook School, West Hartford – Harvest being done by Eversource.

12:00 PM, Suffield, North Stone St Powerline cut

Friday, September 23rd, 6:00 PM ELCCT Powerline cut on Willis St, Bristol.  Meet at the parking area just inside the gate on Willis St.

Location of sites and times are still being determined and will continually be updated on this website.

Connecticut news Chapter Menu

National Facebook

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Pictured here: An 1891 circular for American chestnuts reveals the value of chestnuts to our community of growers and the agricultural pipeline that fed our families and communities. This circular shows $271,527 in sales from TWO months of harvesting. Today's value would be almost $9 million! The seller of these chestnuts probably paid less than $2/bushel wholesale but market rate was about $10 to $12 per bushel. According to research, the legal weight limit of a bushel of chestnuts was about 50 pounds (in TN) and 57 pounds (in VA). This two months of harvesting amounted to approximately 1.3 million pounds of chestnuts. ... See MoreSee Less

Pictured here: An 1891 circular for American chestnuts reveals the value of chestnuts to our community of growers and the agricultural pipeline that fed our families and communities. This circular shows $271,527 in sales from TWO months of harvesting. Todays value would be almost $9 million! The seller of these chestnuts probably paid less than $2/bushel wholesale but market rate was about $10 to $12 per bushel. According to research, the legal weight limit of a bushel of chestnuts was about 50 pounds (in TN) and 57 pounds (in VA). This two months of harvesting amounted to approximately 1.3 million pounds of chestnuts.

Comment on Facebook

These numbers from 1981 are hard to believe. This was just prior to the introduction of chestnut blight in the USA when there was likely an abundance of trees and nuts. There is no header to indicate buyer / seller/ location. Dated Fall of 1890 is not a good business practice. The perfect print looks like it was done on a modern day grocery bag. Was this created by AI?

Where was the harvest? European or Japanese hybrids?

youtu.be/2VYviSHyB98

Meet Ciera! Our nursery manager at Meadowview Research Farms.

This interview is episode 1 of our new YouTube series "Behind the Bark."

Behind the Bark is a casual interview series by The American Chestnut Foundation to dive deeper into the lives of the wonderful people who are behind the mission of returning the iconic American chestnut to its native range.

The American Chestnut Foundation's Meadowview Research Farms
... See MoreSee Less

Video image

Comment on Facebook

One of the biggest questions we receive is "how do I submit a public comment, what am I supposed to say?" The answer is pretty simple: why does the American chestnut tree matter to you? When submitting a comment, you just need to be unique and authentic. Tell your personal story of why the American chestnut is important to you: maybe your family grew up with chestnut trees and can remember when they filled the forests, or maybe you're passionate about forest health and restoration, or maybe you grow chestnut trees on your land and want more.

The USDA looks for unique and custom comments. You don't have to be a scientist to support the restoration of the American chestnut! You can be anyone, all you need is a few sentences of why you support this effort. Check out these helpful tips and sample comments that we've compiled if you're still unsure of what to say. Be sure to submit your comment by midnight on Thursday, January 26.

Visit acf.org/resources-deregulation-darling58/ to learn more and to submit your comment.
... See MoreSee Less

One of the biggest questions we receive is how do I submit a public comment, what am I supposed to say? The answer is pretty simple: why does the American chestnut tree matter to you? When submitting a comment, you just need to be unique and authentic. Tell your personal story of why the American chestnut is important to you: maybe your family grew up with chestnut trees and can remember when they filled the forests, or maybe youre passionate about forest health and restoration, or maybe you grow chestnut trees on your land and want more. 

The USDA looks for unique and custom comments. You dont have to be a scientist to support the restoration of the American chestnut! You can be anyone, all you need is a few sentences of why you support this effort. Check out these helpful tips and sample comments that weve compiled if youre still unsure of what to say. Be sure to submit your comment by midnight on Thursday, January 26. 

Visit https://acf.org/resources-deregulation-darling58/ to learn more and to submit your comment.Image attachmentImage attachment+3Image attachment
Load more
   

Subscribe to the CT Chapter Newsletter

* indicates required